When most members of the church read the Bible, they do so in their native language, which in this country is predominantly English. However, none of the Scriptures were originally written in any modern language. The early church read the New Testament and the Hebrew Bible primarily in the Koine dialect of Greek. While today was have many translations of the Bible, reading the original languages can give us a clearer understanding of what might have been meant by the authors. At the same time, understanding the Greek behind the modern translations can also help us know when the original texts have different meanings that the English being used. This is not to say that translators are wrong, but rather to help us understand that translation is an art more than a science. This course will help lay the foundations for reading the Koine Greek of the New Testament and the Septuagint, and early translation of the Hebrew Bible. For a fuller understanding of Koine Greek, students are encouraged to continue into the second semester of this course.

While the Church of the Brethren has long held the New Testament as its focus, the Hebrew Bible, also called the Old Testament, is the basis of much of the New Testament’s faith. In this course, we will work through the various books of the Hebrew Bible and look at their ancient context. We will attempt to better understand how these books interact and how they influence the New Testament texts. We will also look at a number of modern theories about these texts and how these theories influence how these books are read today.

Introduction to the academic discipline of Biblical Studies as well as to online learning, and Brethren approaches to Scripture. Required for beginning TRIM students, optional for EFSM.

This Weekend-Intensive course gives an overview of the history of Christianity from the apostolic period to the eve of the Reformation. Topics addressed include theoretical issues in studying the history of Christianity, early Christianity, the Constantinian shift, Augustine's influence, asceticism, the Middle Ages, medieval lay piety and dissent, monastic orders, the papacy, and the beginnings of the Renaissance.

This online course gives an overview of the history of Christianity from the apostolic period to the eve of the Reformation. Topics addressed include theoretical issues in studying the history of Christianity, early Christianity, the Constantinian shift, Augustine's influence, asceticism, the Middle Ages, medieval lay piety and dissent, monastic orders, the papacy, and the beginnings of the Renaissance.