This course introduces theology as a practice of creative and critical reflection on humanity, the world, and God from a faith perspective.  In this class we will put perennial theological themes in dialogue with current issues of social violence and injustice that challenge Christian communities today.  By connecting the theological tradition with current social issues, we will consider ways to respond to them from a Christian peacemaking perspective.

Throughout the history of Christianity, individuals and communities have employed a variety of different means to express their commitment to God.  Various forms of prayer, pilgrimage, communal living, and ascetical discipline developed as ways to express piety.  Men and women often exercised their faith with notably different devotional practices.  This course explores selected devotional expressions within Christianity from the early church through the modern period, paying particular attention to the ways that male and female Christian devotion developed.  Students will consider the various theological and social factors that contributed to similar and different forms of devotion among women and men as well as changes in devotional practice over time.  Particular topics of study will include prayer, pilgrimage, food piety, asceticism, martyrdom, communal living, and devotional literature. Prerequisites:  H101 or H102.